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Quotation Marks


- Quotations and speech

British and United States style differs as to whether single or double quotation marks are used, but neither is an absolute rule, and both are accepted.

'Good morning, Dave,' greeted HAL. (British)
"Good morning, Dave," greeted HAL. (American)
For speech within speech, the other is used as inner quotation marks.

'HAL said, "Good morning, Dave",' recalled Frank. (British)
"HAL said, ‘Good morning, Dave'," recalled Frank. (American)


- Titles of artistic works

Quotation marks are generally used for the titles of shorter works. Whether these are single or double is again a matter of style:

short fiction, poetry, etc.: Arthur C. Clarke's "The Sentinel"
book chapters: The first chapter of 3001: The Final Odyssey is "Comet Cowboy"
articles in books, magazines, journals, etc.: "Extra-Terrestrial Relays," Wireless World, October 1945
album tracks, singles, etc.: David Bowie's "Space Oddity"


- Punctuation

The American convention is for sentence punctuation to be included inside the quotation marks, even if the punctuation is not part of the quoted sentence, while the British style is to have the punctuation outside the quotation marks for small quoted phrases. Despite what is sometimes written on discussions of punctuation, British positioning is the same as American in complete quoted speech:

'Good morning, Dave,' said HAL.

Both styles are accepted on www.123facts.com

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